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Cary Estate Planning Attorney

Offices in Cary, Raleigh and Wake Forest
Serving clients throughout the Triangle area.
Your needs and your life don’t fit into neat little boxes, so your estate planning solutions shouldn’t be limited to a one-size-fits-all estate plan. We take a comprehensive approach, diving deep into your specific wishes, fears, and planning nuances to create a narrowly tailored plan that meets your specific planning needs, and keep in touch to make sure your plan actually works.
We’re different and we really mean it.
Schedule Consultation

We can help you in every stage of life

Newly Weds
New Parents
Individuals
Empty Nesters
Retirees
Caregivers

Yes, we’re big fans of our estate planning services. But check out what our clients are saying...

(That's what really matters!)
“Paul & team were great to work with!”
They were always quick with their response times and did a great job explaining some of the 'legal jargon' to me and my husband in more understandable terms.
Hollie
“We had a great experience”
We had a great experience working with Paul Yokabitus and the team at Cary Estate Planning to set up our Will and Estate Plan. The process was clear and easy, and in the age of COVID, our signing session was very well done, easy, and safe.
Jon
“I would highly recommend Paul”
Paul and his team at Cary Estate Planning are fully committed to creating a personalized experience to develop thorough and comprehensive estate plans. They value their clients and go above and beyond to make sure that no details are missed. I would highly recommend Paul to anyone looking to create an estate plan.
Puja
“Honest, professional approach...”
After attending one of Paul’s estate planning seminars, my husband and I knew we wanted Paul to assist us with our estate planning. His honest, professional approach to this necessary part of life put us at ease with the process. We will continue to recommend Paul and Cary Estate Planning.
Lee
“I strongly recommend Cary Estate Planning.”
I was referred to Paul by my Real Estate Attorney and I could not say enough about how exceptional the client service has been from everyone I spoke to. The communication is prompt and I feel like they really took the time to answer all my questions and set things up exactly as I wanted, but also recommended things to make it easier on my family down the line.
Marylin
Your estate plan starts with a simple
Free Consultation

Our Process

You Schedule a call
  • Meet briefly to learn more
  • Understand your specific estate planning needs
  • Determine if we can help
We Suggest a solution
  • Know what you’ll spend
  • Know how long it’ll take
  • Know if you & loved ones are eligible
We Work together
  • Gather & create your docs
  • Create your plan
  • Provide updates without you even asking
Enjoy a new level of peace of mind
  • Your plan is in place
  • Your family is protected
  • You’re in control
  • We got your back when you need changes

Meet the Team

Paul Yokabitus
Estate Planning Lawyer
Sarah Stilley
Estate Planning Lawyer
Amanda Honea
Probate Lawyer
Steven Lundberg
Estate Planning Lawyer
Marjorie Thornton
Estate Planning Lawyer
Maggie Wells
Firm Administrator
Rebecca Malone
Estate Planning Paralegal
Ashley Stallings
Client Services And Intake Manager
Sara Corman
Client Intake Specialist
Amanda Singletary
Marketing Manager
Alix Yokabitus
Outreach Coordinator
Kendall Jackson
Business Development Manager
Stephanie Munguia
Probate Legal Assistant
Trevor Fraser
Administrative Assistant
Your estate plan starts with a simple
Free Consultation

What makes us different is not just what we do, but why we do it.

Your peace of mind is our passion. We believe that the traditional law firm model is broken. We believe that selling with fear and pressure is not how lawyers should be delivering legal services, and Estate Planning Lawyers are some of the worst culprits. This isn’t a “Dollars for Documents” proposition. Forget billable hours, we hate them as much as you do.
Estate Planning as Our Primary Concentration
Not as a side project, supplemental revenue, or just because “why not?”
No Surprise Fees
You’ll only be charged a fixed fee that is agreed upon ahead of time in writing – no surprise invoices or unexpected charges
No Up-Selling
Estate Planning that is only in YOUR best interest, nothing more and nothing less.
Relationship First
We don’t just take your money and shuffle you out the door. We take the client-attorney relationship very seriously and maintain that relationship for the long haul. You get continuous and consistent communication from us and we’ll be here for you whenever you need us: a major event or minor question.
No Barriers to Entry
No consultation fees*, in-person and phone call options, multiple office locations, and flexible scheduling options. We bend to fit your needs, not the other way around.
Client Service as a Priority, Not an Afterthought
We have crafted our entire practice around the client experience. From having multiple office locations, to the way we structure our fees, and the set-up of our conference rooms, we have you in mind first and foremost. Our flexible payment options also make our legal planning cost-effective and cash-flow friendly.

FAQ

What is a Trust?

A Trust is a contract between three parties: 1) the Trustor or Grantor (the person creating the trust); 2) the Trustee (the person holding title to the property of the Trustor); and 3) the Beneficiary(ies). Unlike an LLC or Corporation, a Trust is not a separate legal entity. It is essentially a set of rules the set out how the Trustee is to hold the assets for the benefit of the Beneficiary(ies). The Trustor sets the rules. Trusts can have many different benefits, but are a complex planning technique that is not appropriate for everyone.

Can I Change a Trust?

Yes. During the life of the Trustor, the Trust can be amended or terminated whenever the Trustor wants. That means the Trust can be changed to evolve with your family and financial circumstances. Once the Trustor has died, the Trust becomes irrevocable and generally cannot be changed without a Court Order.

What if I Don’t Have a Will?

If you do not appoint a Guardian in a Will, or some other writing executed with the same formalities of a Will, then your family will be able to petition the Clerk for Guardianship – but in that event, the Clerk will have no context or background for your kids or your family, so the person you may not have intended to be the Guardian may end up being appointed Guardian by the Clerk.

 

How Much Does Probate Cost?

There are really three potential costs associated with Probate:

• The filing and notice fees (usually $120 and $115-130 depending on the newspaper),

• The Probate fee (0.4% of probate assets up to $6,000), and

• The Attorney’s Fee for assisting with the Probate proceeding ($1,000 – $10,000, depending on the matter and the Attorney).

Does a Will Avoid Probate?

No, not usually. A will is often called a “ticket to probate”, meaning that it only governs assets that would normally need to pass through the court process of probate in order to be passed on to the intended beneficiary. The answer to this question largely depends on the assets and beneficiary designations of the testator (the creator of the will) at the time of their death. Wills are not generally probate avoidance tools, though.

 

What’s the Difference between a Testamentary Trust and a Revocable Living Trust?

Both are created to hold assets for a individual or class or beneficiaries for a variety of reasons – most likely to protect assets from waste and delay gratification for minor or immature beneficiaries. A Testamentary Trust is one that is created at death through your will. It is a direction to the Executor to create a trust if certain conditions are satisfied or not satisfied. For instance, if the intended beneficiary is under a certain age, a direction in the will may create a trust to hold the beneficiary’s share until they reach that certain age. If the beneficiary is already that age or older, the trust would not be created.

A Revocable Living Trust is one that is created during the lifetime of the trust creator is a used to receive all assets of the trust creator, whether by will or by beneficiary designation. This type of trust is generally use in more complex estate plans which require all asset types be governed by a common set of succession and distribution rules.

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155 Parkway Office Ct., Suite 200, Cary, NC 27518
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1033 Wade Ave, Suite 104, Raleigh, NC 27605
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Wake Forest Office
1776 Heritage Center Drive, Suite 204-C, Wake Forest, NC 27587
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